SEO Is Not That Hard

How I Accidentally Implemented the "Binge Bank" Strategy

June 03, 2024 Edd Dawson Season 1 Episode 115
How I Accidentally Implemented the "Binge Bank" Strategy
SEO Is Not That Hard
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SEO Is Not That Hard
How I Accidentally Implemented the "Binge Bank" Strategy
Jun 03, 2024 Season 1 Episode 115
Edd Dawson

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Have you ever stumbled upon success by sheer accident? On today's episode of "SEO is Not That Hard," I reveal how a lack of strategy led to an unexpected victory with the binge bank method for our podcast. Initially, I had no grand plan—just a passion for sharing my SEO expertise and helping others in the field. Tune in to learn how publishing consistently, facing my fears, and delivering valuable, bite-sized content has not only enhanced my speaking skills but also expanded our reach significantly.

You'll hear about my journey from struggling to talk for 30 seconds to effortlessly producing 10-minute episodes packed with actionable tips. Discover why these short, digestible podcasts have become so bingeable and how you can replicate this approach to grow your own content and audience engagement. Whether you're an SEO novice or a seasoned pro, my story offers practical insights and inspiration to help you succeed in your own content creation endeavors.

SEO Is Not That Hard is hosted by Edd Dawson and brought to you by KeywordsPeopleUse.com

You can get your free copy of my 101 Quick SEO Tips at: https://seotips.edddawson.com/101-quick-seo-tips

To get a personal no-obligation demo of how KeywordsPeopleUse could help you boost your SEO then book an appointment with me now

See Edd's personal site at edddawson.com

Ask me a question and get on the show Click here to record a question

Find Edd on Twitter @channel5

Find KeywordsPeopleUse on Twitter @kwds_ppl_use

"Werq" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 License
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Show Notes Transcript

Send us a Text Message.

Have you ever stumbled upon success by sheer accident? On today's episode of "SEO is Not That Hard," I reveal how a lack of strategy led to an unexpected victory with the binge bank method for our podcast. Initially, I had no grand plan—just a passion for sharing my SEO expertise and helping others in the field. Tune in to learn how publishing consistently, facing my fears, and delivering valuable, bite-sized content has not only enhanced my speaking skills but also expanded our reach significantly.

You'll hear about my journey from struggling to talk for 30 seconds to effortlessly producing 10-minute episodes packed with actionable tips. Discover why these short, digestible podcasts have become so bingeable and how you can replicate this approach to grow your own content and audience engagement. Whether you're an SEO novice or a seasoned pro, my story offers practical insights and inspiration to help you succeed in your own content creation endeavors.

SEO Is Not That Hard is hosted by Edd Dawson and brought to you by KeywordsPeopleUse.com

You can get your free copy of my 101 Quick SEO Tips at: https://seotips.edddawson.com/101-quick-seo-tips

To get a personal no-obligation demo of how KeywordsPeopleUse could help you boost your SEO then book an appointment with me now

See Edd's personal site at edddawson.com

Ask me a question and get on the show Click here to record a question

Find Edd on Twitter @channel5

Find KeywordsPeopleUse on Twitter @kwds_ppl_use

"Werq" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 License
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Speaker 1:

Hello and welcome to. Seo is not that hard. I'm your host, ed Dawson, the founder of keywordspeopleusecom, the place to find and organise the questions people ask online. I'm an SEO developer, affiliate marketer and entrepreneur. I've been building and monetising websites for over 20 years and I've bought and sold a few along the way. I'm here to share with you the SEO knowledge, hints and tips I've built up over the years. The SEO knowledge, hints and tips I've built up over the years.

Speaker 1:

Hello, welcome to the latest episode of SEO is not that hard. It's me, ed, here, as usual, and today I'm going to talk about how I accidentally implemented the binge bank strategy with this podcast. Now, the binge bank strategy is not ever heard of before, but as soon as I did hear about it, it was like, oh, I've actually done that, so let's go back to the beginning. So when I started this podcast, I had no real grand strategy for it. I just thought I wanted to start a podcast. I want to try and be consistent and I decided on three times a week. And I also decided that if I was going to produce that many podcasts, I couldn't rely on other people. I didn't have enough people to um who could reliably come on and talk with me on it, and I also had no grand plan on what the content was going to be. I just thought I've got a whole load of SEO knowledge in my head. I want to try and get it out. I want to do it in a way that's useful for people, and after trying to record the very first few episodes, I realized that I found it at that time very hard to talk for probably more than 30 seconds at a time and to build up even like a 10-minute podcast took hours at that time and now much faster.

Speaker 1:

And many of these podcasts that you hear are pretty much come out all in one go, and I also didn't want to spend a lot of time sitting down writing scripts. I wanted it to be natural. I wanted it to be, you know, sort of straight from my brain through the microphone you know of, straight straight from at my brain through the microphone, you know, into your ears. So that meant making every podcast, trying to make it actionable on one topic. Maybe it covers a few topics sometimes. I know the recent um top tips ones have covered a whole bunch of things in 10 minutes, um, but again, that's. It's on a type of topic, isn't it? It's short tips. It's just trying to help in that way.

Speaker 1:

So that was how I decided to go for it, and I thought I'm just going to talk into the ether. I'm not going to do a lot of promotion to start with. I am just going to start publishing and keep publishing and keep publishing to try and get over a the fear of, you know, listening to my own voice. Be the fear of drying up, see the fear of no one listening. So, rather than worry about whether I'm going to listen, just assume that no one was going to listen. Um, and not try to overthink it too much, but just start putting them out, be consistent and see what happens over time. Now, on a personal level, I've really enjoyed doing it because it's helped me improve my speaking ability loads. As I say, I can now speak, I think more clearly, I think more coherently and I can certainly speak for a much greater depth and length than I could previously, sort of, you know, back in September of 2023.

Speaker 1:

Now, what I've actually built up over time is actually a large number of podcasts, sort of short form for podcasts, really, sort of anywhere between 5 and sort of 15 minutes. The average is probably about 10 minutes. I suspect I've not worked it out, but it actually turns out that these little podcasts are quite bingeable. And I've noticed this from the stats um, because obviously we can see which podcasts get downloaded um on a daily basis and obviously when we release a new podcast, that gets a big chunk of um of listen straight away and over a period of a week or two and then it'll die down um, but sometimes in those um stats and on a daily stats I can see where all of a sudden, we might get a whole load of earlier podcasts get listened to in a row. Just you know one, two, three listens. You know, and I can see that someone being on the podcast, that someone who's gone back and discovered the podcast however, by whatever means, I've discovered it but they've then gone back and started to listen to podcast after podcast after podcast, and when they're only sort of 10 minutes long, I think it's easy for you to invest in just listening to another one and to another one and to another one.

Speaker 1:

And I, for example, when I binge tv programs, a couple of years ago I had a hernia operation and I was laid up in bed for a couple of weeks afterwards on some quite strong painkillers and I just wanted to put on some TV that I could just zone in and out of, basically, and binge in that regard. And I chose the American office because there were short episodes, because on Netflix, without the ad, adverts and stuff, they're like 20 minutes each and you know I could just and there was lots of them. I think there's 300, 400 episodes. There's huge. There are a huge number of episodes. I knew that I could spend two weeks on that and it just fit that binging pack. If it was something that was a smaller number of episodes, I wouldn't be able to get invested in it before running out of them. And also, if there was ones where there were long episodes, I couldn't kind of snack on it at 20 minute intervals and start a new hour-long episode always felt like a long, big commitment up front, whereas if it's just 20 minutes, I could be there again thinking, yeah, I've got 20 minutes in me, I can keep my eyes open for the 20 minutes I'll watch another one, whereas if it was coming up and saying you've got to invest an hour, then no, it wouldn't necessarily do that.

Speaker 1:

So I've realized that what I've done is created a whole bunch of podcasts that are easily snackable, bingeable, and I say that it's come up to me twice today. That's because I was having a um call today with um qs people use and a podcast listener uh, hi, richard, if you're listening and um, he just said you know how he's found the podcast and he'd been binging on it. And um, you know that word binging came up and then later in the day I'd gone out. Um, I just put a podcast on. I'd gone out to actually muck out the horses, because my wife and daughter they're off with the horses today and I've been left had to turn a couple of horses out and then just muck out the stables. It's not a big job, but you know it takes uh, 20-30 minutes. So I was like, right, I'll put a podcast on.

Speaker 1:

While I'm doing that and I came across a podcast I don't normally listen to, but it's called. It's on my feed and it's called let me just check it's called my First Million. It's a HubSpot podcast and it was how to master storytelling and I'm interested in storytelling. It's something that's important if you're writing any kind of content. I'm always trying to improve my storytelling.

Speaker 1:

I thought, well, I'll listen to this one and the guy who was being interviewed in it is called Sian Puri and he discussed quite early on this concept of a binge bank. Um, and it was from a couple of um guys that he'd he'd come across, um who basically were creating lots and lots of little snackable bits of content and weren't really worrying about whether any of them really hit the mark or went viral at any one point. And you know, he said to them why are you bothering if no one's listening or no one's watching? I think they were doing videos, but if no one's watching, why are you doing them? And they were like I know what we're doing because we're creating a binge bank. This is so that when someone does discover us the ones that do pop and get discovered, those people if they find them and like us, they can then go back and there's a whole load of content for them to listen to and they can binge on it.

Speaker 1:

And I I just thought that's when I realized, hang on, that's what I've done by accident, but it was never a strategy I set out to achieve. I would say that it's now something that I'm going to consider for other things that we do and other people who you know, when I'm consulting with people with their asking advice, it's definitely something that in can work in certain circumstances. It's certainly worked for me on this podcast. I certainly see people obviously discover the podcast at a certain point and then dive back and listen to loads and loads and loads. And you know I've chatted with loads of you out there. There's a whole whole bunch of you out there who've had chats with me and you know who you are. So thank you very much for being listeners. I say it at the end in the pre-recorded outro, but I do really appreciate it. It is great to have people listening.

Speaker 1:

I started off not expecting anything. It was more to sort of get myself out of my own comfort zone and do something different, but it's actually been one of the most, yeah, valuable things I think in in terms of my growth to have ever actually done to start the podcast, um. So, yeah, thanks for all the guys and girls who um have listened, binged and got in touch. If you are one of those people and you're listening and you want to have a chat, my door is always open. There are links in the show notes on how to get in touch. I do find it really valuable talking to listeners because, a it helps me improve the podcast. B it helps me improve keywords people use. You wouldn't believe how valuable it is to see how different people use the product and how different people listen to the podcast and what they find valuable and where I can improve. So if you've been sitting on the fence thinking should I get in touch, then please do. I always spare half an hour for people and I say yeah, the ways of contacting me are in the show notes.

Speaker 1:

So that's the binge bank strategy, if you can. It doesn't have to be podcasts, doesn't have to be podcasts. It doesn't have to be videos, it can be blog content, page content, it can be essays, it can be all sorts of things. But if you can make something that is bingeable, then do, because you'll see that that content will pay off over time. It doesn't always have to pop instantly to be worthwhile. Things will you know, things will get the listers over time if you make it that kind of bingeable content. So it's a really interesting strategy.

Speaker 1:

Anyhow, thanks for listening and I'll see you next time. So it's not that hard. Before I go, I just wanted to let you know that if you'd like a personal demo of our tools that keywords people use, that you can book a free, no one-on-one video call with me where I show you how we can help you level up your content by finding and answering the questions your audience actually have. You can also ask me any SEO questions you have. You just need to go to keywordspeoplesusecom slash demo where you can pick a time and date that suits you for us to catch up Once again. That's keywordspeopleusecom slash demo and you can also find that link in the show notes of today's episode. Hope to chat with you soon.

Speaker 1:

Thanks for being a listener. I really appreciate it. Please subscribe and share. It really helps. Seo is not that hard. It's brought to you by keywordspeopleusecom, the place to find and organize the questions people ask online. See why thousands of people use us every day. Try it today for free at keywordspeopleusecom to get an instant hit of more seo tips. Then find the link to download a free copy of my 101 quick seo tips in the show notes of today's episode. If you want to get in touch, have any questions, I'd love to hear from you. I'm at channel 5 on twitter. You can email me at podcast at keywords people usecom. Bye for now and see you in the next episode of SEO is not that hard.