SEO Is Not That Hard

Quick SEO Tips #81 to #90

May 27, 2024 Edd Dawson Season 1 Episode 112
Quick SEO Tips #81 to #90
SEO Is Not That Hard
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SEO Is Not That Hard
Quick SEO Tips #81 to #90
May 27, 2024 Season 1 Episode 112
Edd Dawson

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Embark on a journey to SEO mastery as I, Ed Dawson, unravel the intricacies of optimizing your digital footprint in the latest podcast episode. From the power of the rel="canonical" tag to the art of handling user-generated content, you're about to gain insights you can't afford to miss. This episode is a treasure trove for affiliate marketers, entrepreneurs, and anyone yearning to conquer search engine rankings with finesse.

Within this enlightening session, I lay out a roadmap for topic-centric content creation that naturally incorporates keywords, transforming your site into an authoritative hub. Learn how to skillfully moderate user contributions to protect your site's integrity, and discover why nofollow links are your safeguard against unwanted affiliations. Ready to elevate your online presence? Tune in and let's tackle SEO with strategies that are proven to work.

SEO Is Not That Hard is hosted by Edd Dawson and brought to you by KeywordsPeopleUse.com

You can get your free copy of my 101 Quick SEO Tips at: https://seotips.edddawson.com/101-quick-seo-tips

To get a personal no-obligation demo of how KeywordsPeopleUse could help you boost your SEO then book an appointment with me now

See Edd's personal site at edddawson.com

Ask me a question and get on the show Click here to record a question

Find Edd on Twitter @channel5

Find KeywordsPeopleUse on Twitter @kwds_ppl_use

"Werq" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 License
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Show Notes Transcript

Send us a Text Message.

Embark on a journey to SEO mastery as I, Ed Dawson, unravel the intricacies of optimizing your digital footprint in the latest podcast episode. From the power of the rel="canonical" tag to the art of handling user-generated content, you're about to gain insights you can't afford to miss. This episode is a treasure trove for affiliate marketers, entrepreneurs, and anyone yearning to conquer search engine rankings with finesse.

Within this enlightening session, I lay out a roadmap for topic-centric content creation that naturally incorporates keywords, transforming your site into an authoritative hub. Learn how to skillfully moderate user contributions to protect your site's integrity, and discover why nofollow links are your safeguard against unwanted affiliations. Ready to elevate your online presence? Tune in and let's tackle SEO with strategies that are proven to work.

SEO Is Not That Hard is hosted by Edd Dawson and brought to you by KeywordsPeopleUse.com

You can get your free copy of my 101 Quick SEO Tips at: https://seotips.edddawson.com/101-quick-seo-tips

To get a personal no-obligation demo of how KeywordsPeopleUse could help you boost your SEO then book an appointment with me now

See Edd's personal site at edddawson.com

Ask me a question and get on the show Click here to record a question

Find Edd on Twitter @channel5

Find KeywordsPeopleUse on Twitter @kwds_ppl_use

"Werq" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 4.0 License
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Speaker 1:

Hello and welcome to. Seo is not that hard. I'm your host, ed Dawson, the founder of keywordspeopleusecom, the place to find and organise the questions people ask online. I'm an SEO developer, affiliate marketer and entrepreneur. I've been building and monetising websites for over 20 years and I've bought and sold a few along the way. I'm here to share with you the SEO knowledge, hints and tips I've built up over the years. Hello and welcome to this latest episode of SEO is not that hard, and in this episode, we're going to cover my quick SEO tips from numbers 81 to numbers 90. So, without further ado, let's dive in.

Speaker 1:

So, tip 81, use rel="chronicle to tell Google which version of any page that can be found via multiple URLs is the one that they should consider the authoritative version. In some cases, you may find that a page can be found on your website on more than one unique URL. Now, this is common on sites that use CMSs like WordPress that allow you to have pages in multiple categories, but this could lead to google deciding it was duplicate content, and we'd rather avoid that. So if we set one version to be the canonical version, this allows you to tell google which to use as the one to index and treat as the authoritative version. It's, um, just a tag that you set in the html of your code. Most cms's will allow you to set what the canonical version of a page is if you go to the page settings and things like that. So just google whatever cms you're using and how to set the canonical tag the rel equals chronicle tag and go from there.

Speaker 1:

Tip 82 always no follow links that are within user generated content. So if you allow users to post their own content on your on your site say if you had a forum on your site or if you allow users to post their own content on your site say if you had a forum on your site or you're allowing people to post comments on your blog and these can include links then you need to tag these links as either nofollow or UGC. This is because you want Google to know that you don't endorse these links as a site and it protects you should a user decide to link to a site that may harm your site. It's just a safety method in there. So you can clearly say to Google this content and these links are user generated and not to be considered the editorial views of this website. Tip 83. If you allow any kind of user generated content, then I strongly suggest you moderate it before allowing it to be posted. Now this follows on from the previous tip.

Speaker 1:

The very safest way to deal with any user generated content is to proactively moderate it before you allow it to be posted. This works well for sites that allow reviews. Not so well if you've got a forum, because adding delays in forums for moderation can have a detrimental experience for your site users. But forums a good forum will tend to self-police itself and you can do post-moderation. That's where you go in and if someone has broken rules and other users have reported, then you can maybe go and remove and edit things after they've been posted. But if you're doing review sites, especially where these are sites where users aren't going to be um, they're not really conversing with each other, they're not building a reputation for themselves, um, it's very sensible to moderate those um before you post them. The same with uh, if you allow blog comments on any or post comments anything. You've got with broadbandcouk um, that we allowed people to review their broadband supplier and we got some horrendously rude and possibly libelous reviews that people tried to put on there. So we always moderated every single one of those reviews that we received before we decided to post it, sometimes just to remove profanity and sometimes just because they were gibberish and spam, or sometimes just because we felt that you that it was a potentially libelous review.

Speaker 1:

Tip 84. Concentrate on topics, not individual keywords. Write about a topic and the keywords get included. Naturally, too many people obsess over individual keywords and trying to rank for them and this can lead you to focus too narrowly when producing contrament, to the detriment of your site. By focusing on writing naturally on a topic and the subtopics within, you'll naturally cover many more keywords in a way that flows for your readers and over time, this is the kind of content that will build your site into a topical authority. You know this is a frustration I've always had is the way that people will sort of frustrate themselves by concentrating too much on keyword volume as a metric and chasing volume, rather than trying to kind of holistically cover and semantically cover a topic in the in the round and just by right, just right, naturally. You know google is now so much better than it was many years ago, understanding semantic, semantically related words, terms, phrases, and so you don't have to blindly hit keywords. It's much more sophisticated in the way that it understands content nowadays compared to, you know, pre-hummingbird. So, yeah, don't don't focus too much on keywords. Focus on broad topic areas and you'll you'll write much better content. Tip 85 there's nothing wrong with old, evergreen content, but every so often, give it a reread and update anything that's now out of date.

Speaker 1:

Many people in the seo world obsess a little too much about fresh and new content and they're convinced that you have to keep churning out new content all the time to stay relevant and keep ranking. But that's really not my experience at all. I mean, I've got sites I haven't added any pages to for years, but they still rank well. Do make sure, though, that pages keep up to date as things change like, like you know, on broadbandcouk, we had to keep up on on top of the latest broadband tech. But don't just churn out new content all the time for the sake of it. You know, look at some, especially if you're covering historical stuff. Lots of facts don't change. You don't have to be constantly refreshing stuff.

Speaker 1:

I think a lot of people get confused because there is a concept of of course, query deserves freshness. In Google, where for specific topics, and especially news topics. Google, where for specific topics and especially news topics, then, yes, google will look for sites with new and fresh content, but that doesn't cover every single query and I think you know 90 plus 99 percent, even probably the questions that people ask on Google don't need to be from fresh content. They just need to be from good, authoritative content. To page six create faq pages, frequently asked questions pages, and you can use, obviously use keywords people use to find the questions that people are frequently asking. People search on google to get answers to questions. It's just plain common sense to cover frequently asked questions on your site. Faqs work particularly well on product pages and review pages, but pretty much any page can benefit from an FAQ section. So, yeah, always make sure to include FAQs and, you know, always go to a good source such as Qwity for Use for finding what people are actually asking.

Speaker 1:

Tip 87, your site should have these basic pages about privacy policy, terms and conditions and contact. The google quality rate guidelines specifically recommends that raters look for these types of pages when trying to evaluate ee18 experience, expertise, authority to miss and trust the signals for a website that google wants those sites which have those ee80 signals. They also add trust signals for audience because they show who you are, how you look after their personal data and how they can get in touch with you. Personally, I don't like if I look at a site and it doesn't show me at least just in the have somewhere where I can just find some basic information about how to contact a site. Um, you know what the terms conditions are, who owns a site? If, what the terms and conditions are, who owns the site? If those things are missing, then a whole lot of trust is missing and Google is going to pick up on those things. So just put those basic pages on. They don't take a long time to produce. For all the privacy policy terms and conditions, all those legalese. There's lots of free templates out there that you can use, and to put a contact form on it's dead, dead simple. So do put those on all your sites.

Speaker 1:

Tip 88 use a content calendar to plan what content to produce and when to publish it, especially if you're working with a seasonal topic. Yeah, this is especially important if there's any kind of seasonality or time sensitivity to your site's themes. E-commerce sites tend to have busy seasons, depending on what they're selling and you want you want your content lined up and ready before you peak. There's no point writing a guide to summer gardening trends in the summer, because by the time you've written it, the time you've got it on your website, the time it's got indexed, the time it's started ranking, by the time all that is done, the season is over. You've got to line things up early and ready for these things and if you cover sports or any kind of upcoming events that happen in the topic you're covering, you need to be ready for them. Think big sporting events here you know. You know when the FA Cup final is coming, you know when the Super Bowl is coming. If you want to time any content with these things, you've got to have a plan up front of when you're going to do it, get it lined up, get the resources in and make sure the content's produced well in time.

Speaker 1:

Tip 89 build on existing pages. Add new content to existing pages that rank well to make them rank for even more related terms. You know always keep an eye on your existing pages that are doing well. Can you improve or add to them to increase its reach even more? I mean it can often be easier and bring quicker results to build on existing content rather than starting from scratch. Um, so, yes, always evaluate where you can improve on the pages you've got, because it's just a great, perfect starting point.

Speaker 1:

And tip 90, try and build a brand over time so you become the authority for a topic area. I mean, google loves brands, people love brands. By building a brand, you send in positive signals to your customers and to Google when you end game and I know it's not easy, but the end game is to try and get people to think of your site when they think of a topic. And you don't have to have it so that the entire world thinks of your site and think of a topic. But if you are serving your audience well and you become a leader in your topical area, then people who are interested in that area and that topic will start to get to know you and they will start to come to you and they will start to link to you. So that's why it's worth trying to build a brand and just thinking about whether your content's good enough to bring people back repeatedly, whether you're covering it enough so that if someone who is trying to research, learn about or is just a real enthusiast for a topic area will start to think of your site and that's how you start to build a brand.

Speaker 1:

So that's all all the tips for today. I hope you found them useful and we'll see you next time for more tips. Before I go, I just wanted to let you know that if you'd like a personal demo of our tools at Keywords People Use that, you can book a free, no obligation one-on-one video call with me where I show you how we can help you level up your content by finding and answering the questions your audience actually have. You can also ask me any SEO questions you have. You just need to go to keywordspeopleusecom slash demo where you can pick a time and date that suits you for us to catch up Once again. That's keywordspeopleusecom slash demo and you can also find that link in the show notes of today's episode. Hope to chat with you soon.

Speaker 1:

Thanks for being a listener. I really appreciate it. Please subscribe and share. It really helps. Seo is not that hard. It's brought to you by keywordspeopleusecom, the place to find and organize the questions people ask online. See why thousands of people use us every day. Try it today for free at keywordspeopleusecom To get an instant hit of more SEO tips. Then find the link to download a free copy of my 101 quick SEO tips in the show notes of today's episode. If you want to get in touch, have any questions, I'd love to hear from you. I'm at Channel 5 on Twitter. You can email me at podcast at keywordspeopleusecom. Bye for now and see you in the next episode of SEO is not that hard.